This post announces our latest From Our Readers question: Which writer or work made you think about point of view in a different way and why? Comment for a chance at publication in a future issue of Writer’s Digest.

Our upcoming March/April 2022 issue is focused on point of view. WD would love to know what particular writer or work made you think about point of view in a totally different way.

Our formal question: Which writer or work made you think about point of view in a different way and why?

There are plenty of books that I look back on and realize had a tremendous impact on me as a writer, especially when it comes to exploring the intricacies of point of view. One of those books is Stephen King’s The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon, which I read in 4th grade. I can say that was the first time I unconsciously clocked the idea that a third-person narrator could withhold information from a reader when the perspective is filtered through a particular character.

However, when I think about the first time I actively considered POV while reading, the first book that comes to mind is Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn. The way that time, character, and truth are all explored through the novel’s structure was striking to me. I was, at the time, a first-person-POV-only kind of writer. This was the book that encouraged me to explore my writing play in a totally new way, and now I find it more difficult to write in first person than third.

Now, POV is something that I actively study when I read. No matter the genre, cast, or theme, your story can change drastically depending on what POV you decide to filter it through.

Which writer or work made you think about point of view in a different way and why? Share your answers with us in the comments below for a chance to be published in the March/April 2022 issue of Writer’s Digest. Here are the guidelines:

Provide an answer to the question “Which writer or work made you think about point of view in a different way and why?” in the comments below.Answers can be funny, weird, poignant, thought-provoking, entertaining, etc.Remember to include your name as you would like it to appear in print.Deadline for commenting this time around is November 19, 2021.Only comments shared below will be considered for publication, though feel free to share your answers on social media with the following hashtags: #WDReaders and #WritingAchievement.

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